Chateau Montelena is the perfect complement to Gladwell’s David and Goliath

David and Goliath 2Dyslexia is a disability—or is it? Air raids destroy morale—or do they? David’s victory over Goliath was a miracle–or was it?

Starting with the biblical story of David and Goliath, Malcolm Gladwell provides a new perspective on how we traditionally think about what is advantageous and what is debilitating. He forces the reader to reconsider traditional assumptions about characteristics and situations as beneficial or detrimental. Circumstances and/or personality traits that are traditionally considered to be disadvantages, such as dyslexia, could actually be the x factor that creates success. On the flip side, factors traditionally thought to lead to success, such as attending elite schools, may in fact have the opposite effect.

Like Gladwell’s previous book, Outliers, David and Goliath uses thorough research and fascinating stories throughout a diverse range of times, places, and circumstances to illustrate his point that “much of what is beautiful and important in the world arises from what looks like suffering and adversity.” Chapter by chapter, Gladwell shows us how certain dynamics apply to and impact our realities in ways we may not perceive. These stories question modern assumptions and demonstrate the amazing human capacity to adapt and overcome.

In the 1970s, Chateau Montelena played the role of David to the Goliath of the French wine industry. It was the underdog in a blind wine tasting that started California wines on the road to the prominence they enjoy today. Their story is the basis of the movie Bottle Shock. Chateau Montelena is most famous for its Chardonnay, which is excellent. However, they also make an amazing Cabernet Sauvignon. Either of them would be a superb complement to this book. Enjoy, and happy reading!

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